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Sep 17

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Former Tennessee Judge Faces Corruption Charges

A now disgraced former Tennessee Judge is facing up to 30 years in prison after the FBI discovered a long list of abuses by his office. Casey Morland of Nashville,TN would seem on the surface like your run in the mill "good old country boy".   On March 28, 2017, Moreland was arrested by federal officials and charged with obstructing an investigation, tampering with a witness, and retaliating against a witness. 

According to court documents, the FBI began investigating Moreland in January 2017 based on allegations that he used his power as a judge in exchange for sexual favors, free travel, and lodging. Moreland then allegedly tried to bribe a woman who had made public allegations against him to sign an affidavit saying that she had lied. The documents also said that Moreland had discussed plans to plant drugs on the woman and orchestrate a traffic stop in order to impair her credibility.

The Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct began its own investigation into the allegations against Moreland. After his arrest, state legislative leaders called on Moreland to resign. "If he does not, we urge the Board of Judicial Conduct to act in an expeditious manner," stated the legislators. The most severe punishment the board could hand down would be a recommendation to the legislature to remove Moreland from his position.

At a court hearing on March 31, 2017, Moreland's attorney announced that the judge would resign, effective April 4, 2017. During the hearing, U.S. Magistrate Judge Joe Brown sustained the charges against Moreland but allowed him to be released to home confinement.

House arrest and he gets to keep his pension of $4500.00 a month. Somehow it seems this ex-judge still has friends in high places. That assumption keeps being further verified by the court continuing to postpone the trial time after time. In fact instead of moving closer to justice, the former judge has filed to have his ankle monitoring device removed.

How could a Judge, a person that works daily with the law, so easily and blatantly break it? Where would he get the idea he could get away with it? Could it be because he has broken the law in the past and gotten away with it? Of course he has.

On October 22, 2014, the Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct issued Moreland a public reprimand. The board found that Moreland had violated three judicial canons by: failing to comply with the Judicial Code, failing to act in a manner that promotes the "independence, integrity, and impartiality of the judiciary," and abusing the prestige of his judicial office by advancing his own interests.

On November 7, 2014, Judge Melissa Blackburn filed a complaint against Judge Moreland, claiming that he bullied female court employees and threw mattresses and papers in the offices of the mental health court. The Tennessee Board of Judicial Conduct cleared Moreland of the misconduct complaint in July 2015. The board's report said, "It was the unanimous decision of the investigative panel that the factual allegations in the complaint, which would have given rise to a potential violation of the Code of Judicial Conduct, did not occur."

We have to wonder how many people were unfairly sentenced or harmed by this former Judge, while he was on the bench. How could this man get away with his crimes? The delusion that people that serve us are noble must be removed from our minds. We need to stop as a society, being blinded by a robe or a badge. People should be seen for their actions not their jobs. We are all equal people on this planet. The sum of my years have granted me no special insight over you and vice versa. We live here for a very short time in the grand scheme of things. The person in the oval office has just as many bad thoughts as you or I. The difference is we are held accountable when we do wrong. We are punished. Somehow those we entrust to uphold that system of laws have manipulated it to escape justice. We must do better.

Recently, Attorney General Jeff Sessions appointed a new US Attorney to the area, to replace the old one. Mark H. Wildasin has been appointed to the position after serving as civil chief in the U.S. Attorney’s Nashville office since January 2006.

The people seeking justice in the judge's case are hoping the change will mean this case can stop hanging in limbo.

If you wish to contact the US Attorneys Office to ask about this case, the publicly listed contact information is:

CONTACTS FOR THE MIDDLE DISTRICT OF TENNESSEE:
US Attorney’s Office: 615-736-5151
FBI JTTF: 615-232-7500
Tennessee Fusion Center: 877-250-2333 (toll-free)

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Severin Freeman has been involved in activism for several years. He believes that all people should be treated totally equal and that no one has a higher claim to us or our freedom, than ourselves. He has played a role in the founding and growth of many activist groups across the Lehigh Valley area. His mission has become to expose those that would threaten our freedom and natural liberties.